Contact

info@syndevrx.com

1 Broadway # 14, Cambridge, MA 02142

The Metabo-oncology Company

Metabo-oncology — which focuses on the link between cancer and metabolic dysfunction — is poised to spark a paradigm shift in cancer treatment.

The leader in this emerging field isn’t some big pharma. Rather, it’s a clever and persistent company based in Cambridge, Massachusetts, called SynDevRx.

More on metabo-oncology

  • Treating Cancer and Metabolic Dysfunction

    It’s a fact: People with metabolic dysfunction, which is common in obese and overweight individuals or people with excess belly fat, are more likely to get — and die from — cancer. At least 10 tumor types, representing about 20 percent of U.S. cancer cases, are considered to be “metabolically sensitive.”

    No novel therapy is available for the metabo-oncology patient population. But SynDevRx is working on it.

  • Liver Cancer

    Men with a body mass index (BMI) between 35 and 39.9 were found to have a 4.52-fold (i.e. 352%) increase in the relative risk of death from liver cancer (Calle et al, 2003, New Eng J Med, 348(17):1625-38). In the same study, women with a body mass index (BMI) between 35 and 39.9 were found to have a 1.68-fold (i.e. 68%) increase in the relative risk of death from liver cancer.

    Increased risk of death from cancer when obese:

  • Breast Cancer

    Post-menopausal women with a body mass index (BMI) between 30 and 34.9 were found to have a 1.6-fold (i.e. 60%) increase in the relative risk of death from breast cancer (Calle et al, 2003, New Eng J Med, 348(17):1625-38). In the same study, women with a body mass index (BMI) between 35 and 39.9 were found to have a 1.7-fold (i.e. 70%) increase in the relative risk of death from breast cancer, and women with a BMI ≥ 40 had a 2.1-fold (i.e. 112%) increase in the relative risk of death from breast cancer.

    Increased risk of death from cancer when obese:

  • Pancreatic Cancer

    Men with a body mass index (BMI) between 35 and 39.9 were found to have a 1.49-fold (i.e. 49%) increase in the relative risk of death from pancreatic cancer (Calle et al, 2003, New Eng J Med, 348(17):1625-38). In the same study, women with a body mass index (BMI) between 35 and 39.9 were found to have a 1.41-fold (i.e. 41%) increase in the relative risk of death from pancreatic cancer, while women with a BMI ≥ 40 had a 2.76-fold (i.e. 176%) increase in the relative risk of death from pancreatic cancer.

    Increased risk of death from cancer when obese:

  • Uterine (endometrial) Cancer

    Women with a body mass index (BMI) between 30 and 34.9 were found to have a 2.53-fold (i.e. 153%) increase in the relative risk of death from uterine/endometrial cancer (Calle et al, New Eng J Med; 2003, 348(17):1625-38). In the same study, women with a body mass index (BMI) between 35 and 39.9 were found to have a 2.77-fold (i.e. 177%) increase in the relative risk of death from uterine/endometrial cancer, while women with a BMI ≥ 40 had a 6.25-fold (i.e. 525%) increase in the relative risk of death from uterine/endometrial cancer.

    Increased risk of death from cancer when obese:

  • Ovarian Cancer

    Women with a body mass index (BMI) between 30 and 34.9 were found to have a 1.16-fold (i.e. 16%) increase in the relative risk of death from ovarian cancer (Calle et al, New Eng J Med; 2003, 348(17):1625-38). In the same study, women with a body mass index (BMI) between 35 and 39.9 were found to have a 1.51-fold (i.e. 51%) increase in the relative risk of death from ovarian cancer. A more recent meta-analysis of nine studies found that women who were obese (BMI ≥ 30) had a 1.17-fold (i.e. 17%) increase in risk of dying from ovarian cancer (Nagle et al, British J Cancer, 2015; 113:817–26.

    Increased risk of death from cancer when obese:

  • Colorectal Cancer

    Men with a body mass index (BMI) between 35 and 39.9 were found to have a 1.84-fold (i.e. 84%) increase in the relative risk of death from colorectal cancer while women with a body mass index (BMI) between ≥ 40 were found to have a 1.46-fold (i.e. 46%) increase in the relative risk of death from colorectal cancer (Calle et al, New Eng J Med; 2003, 348(17):1625-38).

    Increased risk of death from cancer when obese:

  • Esophageal Cancer

    Men with a body mass index (BMI) between 30 and 34.9 were found to have a 1.28-fold (i.e. 28%) increase in the relative risk of death from esophageal cancer while men with a body mass index (BMI) between 35 and 39.9 were found to have a 1.63-fold (i.e. 63%) increase in the relative risk of death from esophageal cancer (Calle et al, New Eng J Med; 2003, 348(17):1625-38). In this study there was no statistically significant increase in the relative risk of death from esophageal cancer in women with increased BMI.

    Increased risk of death from cancer when obese: