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The Metabo-oncology Company

Metabo-oncology — which focuses on the link between cancer and metabolic hormone dysfunction — is poised to spark a leap forward in cancer patient treatment.

Cancer and systemic metabolic hormones (e.g., insulin, leptin) caused by overweight, diabetes, or pre-diabetes are closely linked.  Yet, this condition that affects millions of cancer patients is being ignored pharmacologically. Further, many anti-cancer treatments cause metabolic dysfunction which can limit drug effectiveness and even lead to treatment resistance.
SynDevRx – the leader in the emerging  field of metabo-oncology – is tackling this urgent and unmet medical need with its clinical drug SDX-7320.

More on metabo-oncology

  • Treating Cancer and Metabolic Hormone Dysfunction

    It’s a fact: People with systemic metabolic hormone dysfunction, which is common in obese and overweight individuals or people with excess belly fat, type 2 diabetes or pre-diabetes, are more likely to get — and die from — cancer. In 14% of men and 20% of women (U.S.), deaths by cancer are directly related to dysregulated metabolic hormones.

    Among the most common metabolic hormones are insulin and leptin which are systemic and stimulate tumor growth and metastases via validated oncogenic pathways – they’re like pouring gasoline on a burning fire.

    No novel therapy is available for the hundreds of thousands of patients unaware of this disease nexus. SynDevRx has the first clinical drug candidate – SDX-7320 – specifically targeting this highly unmet medical need.

  • Liver Cancer

    Men with a body mass index (BMI) between 35 and 39.9 were found to have a 4.52-fold (i.e. 352%) increase in the relative risk of death from liver cancer (Calle et al, 2003, New Eng J Med, 348(17):1625-38). In the same study, women with a body mass index (BMI) between 35 and 39.9 were found to have a 1.68-fold (i.e. 68%) increase in the relative risk of death from liver cancer.

    Increased risk of death from cancer when obese:

  • Breast Cancer

    Post-menopausal women with a body mass index (BMI) between 30 and 34.9 were found to have a 1.6-fold (i.e. 60%) increase in the relative risk of death from breast cancer (Calle et al, 2003, New Eng J Med, 348(17):1625-38). In the same study, women with a body mass index (BMI) between 35 and 39.9 were found to have a 1.7-fold (i.e. 70%) increase in the relative risk of death from breast cancer, and women with a BMI ≥ 40 had a 2.1-fold (i.e. 112%) increase in the relative risk of death from breast cancer.

    Increased risk of death from cancer when obese:

  • Pancreatic Cancer

    Men with a body mass index (BMI) between 35 and 39.9 were found to have a 1.49-fold (i.e. 49%) increase in the relative risk of death from pancreatic cancer (Calle et al, 2003, New Eng J Med, 348(17):1625-38). In the same study, women with a body mass index (BMI) between 35 and 39.9 were found to have a 1.41-fold (i.e. 41%) increase in the relative risk of death from pancreatic cancer, while women with a BMI ≥ 40 had a 2.76-fold (i.e. 176%) increase in the relative risk of death from pancreatic cancer.

    Increased risk of death from cancer when obese:

  • Uterine (endometrial) Cancer

    Women with a body mass index (BMI) between 30 and 34.9 were found to have a 2.53-fold (i.e. 153%) increase in the relative risk of death from uterine/endometrial cancer (Calle et al, New Eng J Med; 2003, 348(17):1625-38). In the same study, women with a body mass index (BMI) between 35 and 39.9 were found to have a 2.77-fold (i.e. 177%) increase in the relative risk of death from uterine/endometrial cancer, while women with a BMI ≥ 40 had a 6.25-fold (i.e. 525%) increase in the relative risk of death from uterine/endometrial cancer.

    Increased risk of death from cancer when obese:

  • Ovarian Cancer

    Women with a body mass index (BMI) between 30 and 34.9 were found to have a 1.16-fold (i.e. 16%) increase in the relative risk of death from ovarian cancer (Calle et al, New Eng J Med; 2003, 348(17):1625-38). In the same study, women with a body mass index (BMI) between 35 and 39.9 were found to have a 1.51-fold (i.e. 51%) increase in the relative risk of death from ovarian cancer. A more recent meta-analysis of nine studies found that women who were obese (BMI ≥ 30) had a 1.17-fold (i.e. 17%) increase in risk of dying from ovarian cancer (Nagle et al, British J Cancer, 2015; 113:817–26.

    Increased risk of death from cancer when obese:

  • Colorectal Cancer

    Men with a body mass index (BMI) between 35 and 39.9 were found to have a 1.84-fold (i.e. 84%) increase in the relative risk of death from colorectal cancer while women with a body mass index (BMI) between ≥ 40 were found to have a 1.46-fold (i.e. 46%) increase in the relative risk of death from colorectal cancer (Calle et al, New Eng J Med; 2003, 348(17):1625-38).

    Increased risk of death from cancer when obese:

  • Esophageal Cancer

    Men with a body mass index (BMI) between 30 and 34.9 were found to have a 1.28-fold (i.e. 28%) increase in the relative risk of death from esophageal cancer while men with a body mass index (BMI) between 35 and 39.9 were found to have a 1.63-fold (i.e. 63%) increase in the relative risk of death from esophageal cancer (Calle et al, New Eng J Med; 2003, 348(17):1625-38). In this study there was no statistically significant increase in the relative risk of death from esophageal cancer in women with increased BMI.

    Increased risk of death from cancer when obese: